Sunday, June 24, 2007

Can you answer these questions?

Can you guess the answers to these questions?

____________


True or False?


☐ Castration, neutering and removal of both ovaries are
the same.

☐ Sex life is better after hysterectomy.

☐ Death from heart disease is more likely in hysterectomized
women than in normal women.

☐ Hysterectomy has no effect on men’s sex lives.
____________



Hysterectomy: exactly what is it?

During the operation called hysterectomy the uterus is removed
from a woman’s body and its functions are permanently lost.

During a hysterectomy it is a common and unjustified practice for surgeons
to remove normal ovaries and fallopian tubes in surgery called
bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (also called ovariectomy or castration).

Neither hysterectomy nor oophorectomy is constructive or
restorative surgery. Both hysterectomy and
oophorectomy are, by medical definition, destructive procedures.
There is no treatment which is able to restore, replace or compensate for
the functions of the missing organs.

The immediate and life-long complications induced by these
operations have been widely documented in the scientific and
medical literature since their introduction into the surgical
armamentarium, and are well known in medical circles.



What women say about life after hysterectomy

The adverse effects most frequently reported to
the HERS Foundation:

• Loss of sexuality: loss of desire, loss of physical responsiveness and pleasure, and painful intercourse.

• Pain in bones and joints: “locking” of joints so that some women are unable to stand, walk, or lift without assistance; some women require braces, walkers, wheelchairs; some are bedridden.

• Backache: severe, persistent, disabling.

• Extreme dryness of skin, eyes, genital tissues; vaginal atrophy.

• Rapid, abnormal aging of tissues affecting appearance, skin and general health.

• Angina: chest pain and pressure may occur spontaneously, with exertion, or with exposure to cold.

• Cardiovascular disease.

• Chronic urinary problems: stress incontinence, feeling of urgency or irritability, frequent night voiding, infections, fistulae (surgically-caused abnormal openings into the vagina from the urinary tract).

• Internal pain: in pelvis, groin, vagina or side.

• Emotional dislocation: profound depression, crying, emotional blunting; loss of maternal feeling and of emotional connection and response to loved ones.

• Chronic debilitating fatigue which is not relieved by resting: loss of stamina and of ability to resume the pattern of life which preceded surgery, i.e., diminished ability to run a household, return to work, maintain familiy and social connections.

• Persistance of the condition for which surgery was performed: endometriosis, cancer, pelvic infection, urinary disorders, etc.

• Insomnia; panic attacks; heart palpitations; impaired memory and concentration; weight gain; intolerable hot flashes.


Next: What you need to know about hysterectomy

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31 Comments:

At October 22, 2007 at 8:05 PM , Blogger girl said...

AFTER MY HYSTERECTOMY I LOST MY DESIRE FOR AN ORGANISM. IS THERE ANYTHING FOR THIS?

 
At February 28, 2008 at 11:14 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I was given an unnecessary/un-warranted hysterectomy by:
May Grant Associates, Lancaster PA.
Bradford William C DO.

 
At June 12, 2008 at 10:20 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'm 40 years old and I've been diagnosed with a 8cm calcifed fibroid tumour. I just want to know whether using natural progestrone cream will have any effect on the fibroid?

 
At June 12, 2008 at 10:40 AM , Blogger HERS Foundation said...

Please post new comments read the response to the last comment posted at:

http://hysterectomyinformation.blogspot.com

 
At August 7, 2008 at 8:24 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I was told I need a hyst. for having anytomonis. Every month 2/3 weeks I am in pain like labor pains. I have had small cysts and fibrods removed for a least 4 years straight. My doctor told me The only cure for anytomonis is to remove the uturis. After looking at this site and will not do it I have cancled my surgury. What else can I do for the pain?

 
At August 26, 2008 at 9:01 AM , Blogger viv said...

I had hysterectomy in sept 1997 aged 25 for endometriosis. Now 11 years later the pain i had before hysterectomy is back but doctors say it is adhesions and i will have to live with it. They dont believe it is possible for it to be endometriosis. I also have constant back pain and feel suicidal as the pain can be severe.

 
At March 8, 2009 at 1:21 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am 43 years old and had a hyst. 10 years ago. I have had 10 operation on ovarian cysts since I was 17. Due to all the operations i had massive scar tissue which lead to my hysterectomy. I do not like the way I feel when I take HRT and I gain wieght (10 to 15 lbs) within weeks of taking them. I really don't see much difference when I take them. I have NO sex drive at all and the dryness doesn't help either. Reading your page within a half an hour time I have gone to the bathroom 2 times. Am I wrong for not taking the HRT I am going to the ob this week for my yearly check up. BTW no ovaries no cervix no uterus

 
At May 15, 2009 at 11:07 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

MAY 6TH 2009IN KENTUCKY. I HAD A HYSTERECTOMY AND SO FAR I HAVE NO REGRETS, I LEFT MY CERVICS I HAD MY HYST FOR 2 REASONS ONE BECAUSE I HAD A SISTER DIE OF OVARIAN CANCER IN HER EARLY 40'S MY PERIODS WERE TERRIBLE I WOULD SOMETIMES HAVE 3 A MONTH I BELIEVE THERE ARE DOWN SIDES TO EVERY OPERATION BUT THERE IS ALSO UPSIDES TO THEM TO YES I FEEL INCOMPLETE BUT NOW I FEEL ALIVE BECAUSE I NO LONGER HAVE TO BLEED 3 WEEKS OUT OF THE MONTH AND I DONT HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT MY KIDS HAVING TO WATCH ME DIE OF OVARIAN CANCER.

 
At May 27, 2009 at 11:41 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

To anonymous in Kentucky

How are you feeling?? Are you still happy with your decision?? How old are you and just why,other than the tragic death of your sister,did you decide to have a hysterectomy? Was it totally up to you or did your doctor recommend the procedure??

Apparently, you just had this done. Please let me know how you are and the circumstance of your surgery.

Take care

 
At June 29, 2009 at 10:26 AM , Blogger BoyerBlog said...

I had my uterus removed 8 years ago and I have never ever regretted that decision. I had painful, very heavy, periods that kept me housebound for 3-4 days a month. I would try to schedule appointments for work, vacations, and even dinner dates around my period, and inevitably, my period would rear its ugly head during a vacation, unexpectedly.

I still have my ovaries and cervix...

I am free! Live is wonderful, my sex life with my husband is awesome, and believe it or not, since I am not aware of when I ovulate I am not waiting for that blasted PMS.

So....for those of you who fear having your uterus removed, please know that it is not the end of your life to do so...in fact, it could be the beginning.

 
At September 21, 2009 at 3:31 AM , Anonymous Sandra Jones said...

Before I waste a lot of your time, I need to know if I have the right site to respond.

 
At September 21, 2009 at 8:59 AM , Blogger HERS Foundation said...

Sandra,

You have the right site to respond if your comment is relevant to women's health issues, particularly as it relates to hysterectomy. Most of the people commenting here have either been told they need a hysterectomy and they're questioning whether they need it, or if there's an alternative for their condition, or they have undergone the surgery, and want to talk about their experience, and get support and coping strategies from other women.

 
At May 27, 2010 at 2:14 PM , Anonymous sildenafil said...

Question ... is true that during the operation is called a hysterectomy when the uterus is removed from the body of a woman and her roles are permanent??

 
At June 1, 2010 at 8:06 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I HIGHLY recommend reasearching iodine deficiency and female reproductive problems before getting a hysterectomy. Japanese females are know to have the FEWEST reproductive issues while consuming an average of 13milli-grams of iodine per day. By contrast, the average American USRDA recommended dose is an abysmal 150micro-grams (that's right - "micro" which is less than 2% found in the average Japanese diet).

My wife at the age of 36 has had "full" hysterectomies three times* (*each time the doctor's missed an ovarian fragment so her endo symptoms continued). Now she still has endo symptoms along with fatigue and occasional joint pain. The only thing that's gone are her unpredictable heavy painful periods.

Recently her TSH started to rise (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone), so to counteract it, she has been taking an Iodine replacement product called Iodarol (13mg) just to keep her from resorting to Thyroid replacement therapy in addition to her HRT. That's when we discovered that her whole endo problem may have been related to THYROID DEFICIENCY (iodine is converted to thyroid hormone).

Do as much research as you can about the benefits of iodine supplements before going under the knife. A full hysterectomy effects the body MUCH more radically than natural menopause.

 
At September 3, 2010 at 8:33 AM , Anonymous Elizabeth said...

American women must stop having these annual gyn exams, they are a large part of the problem.
You lead such medical lives with constant surveillance of your reproductive organs from an early age. It causes harmful over-treatment.
The evidence of benefit from routine bimanual exams is not there, they are of low to poor clinical value in asymptomatic women and expose you to risk. (from unnecessary procedures and even surgery)
It is not a recommended exam in the UK or Australia at any age. I'm 52 and have never had a routine bimanual exam.
Breast exams - there is no evidence they help, they don't bring down the death rate from cancer, but cause biopsies and some believe they are a risk factor for cancer.

Pap smears - you are pap-smeared to death....the excessive and inappropriate testing is reckless and harmful.
Testing virgins, teenagers, young women, elderly women, women who've had complete hysterectomies for benign conditions...and the over-screening of all women.
This is a rare cancer and testing carries risk, this test must be used sparingly and responsibly.

Finland has the lowest rates of cc in the world and sends the fewest women for biopsies after false positives - they test 5 to 7 times starting from 30 and then 5 yearly to 50, 55 or 60. Many American women in their 60's have had more than 40 pap smears - crazy! (testing under 25 is unsafe, unreliable and does not affect the tiny death rate from cancer)
Over-screening leads straight to day procedure and damage caused by these unnecessary treatments can leave you with problems - infertility, miscarriages, more c-sections, premature babies and psych issues etc.
Remember 99% of women will never have an issue with cc, so don't overdo smears.
As a low risk woman I made an informed decision 30 years ago not to screen and very recently rejected breast screening as well. (concerns about risk)

The excess and lack of respect for women's rights in the States is shocking...even the fact doctors refuse to supply the Pill UNTIL women submit to optional testing and unnecessary exams - this amounts to coercion.
You must break down that barrier, doctors could not justify their conduct in a court of law.
Hysterectomies are more of the same, excess...

Women are brainwashed to believe they'll die without these exams, but I think you're far more likely to be harmed having these exams.
If you want smears, look at the Finnish program.
If you want a mammogram, think about 2-3 yearly from 50, but you don't need anything else.

I hope you can change a harmful system - the greatest abuse of women's rights today...all for profit and in the practise of defensive "medicine".
Get online, there's lots of great and informative sites available - Dr Joel Sherman's medical privacy blog under women's privacy issues.
Blogcritics and Unnecessary pap smears and the Violet to Blue site.
Good luck to all of you....

 
At September 3, 2010 at 8:38 AM , Anonymous Elizabeth said...

American women must stop having these annual gyn exams, they are a large part of the problem.
You lead such medical lives with constant surveillance of your reproductive organs from an early age. It causes harmful over-treatment.
The evidence of benefit from routine bimanual exams is not there, they are of low to poor clinical value in asymptomatic women and expose you to risk. (from unnecessary procedures and even surgery)
It is not a recommended exam in the UK or Australia at any age. I'm 52 and have never had a routine bimanual exam.
Breast exams - there is no evidence they help, they don't bring down the death rate from cancer, but cause biopsies and some believe they are a risk factor for cancer.

Pap smears - you are pap-smeared to death....the excessive and inappropriate testing is reckless and harmful.
Testing virgins, teenagers, young women, elderly women, women who've had complete hysterectomies for benign conditions...and the over-screening of all women.
This is a rare cancer and testing carries risk, this test must be used sparingly and responsibly.

Finland has the lowest rates of cc in the world and sends the fewest women for biopsies after false positives - they test 5 to 7 times starting from 30 and then 5 yearly to 50, 55 or 60. Many American women in their 60's have had more than 40 pap smears - crazy! (testing under 25 is unsafe, unreliable and does not affect the tiny death rate from cancer)
Over-screening leads straight to day procedure and damage caused by these unnecessary treatments can leave you with problems - infertility, miscarriages, more c-sections, premature babies and psych issues etc.
Remember 99% of women will never have an issue with cc, so don't overdo smears.

Also you must free up birth control - doctors refuse to supply the Pill UNTIL women submit to optional testing and unnecessary exams - this amounts to coercion.
Doctors could not justify their conduct in a court of law.
Hysterectomies are more of the same, excess!
All for profit and in the practise of defensive "medicine".
See:Dr Joel Sherman's medical privacy blog under women's privacy issues.
Blogcritics and Unnecessary pap smears and the Violet to Blue site.
Good luck to all of you....

 
At September 3, 2010 at 8:40 AM , Anonymous Elizabeth said...

American women must stop having these annual gyn exams, they are a large part of the problem.
You lead such medical lives with constant surveillance of your reproductive organs from an early age. It causes harmful over-treatment.
The evidence of benefit from routine bimanual exams is not there, they are of low to poor clinical value in asymptomatic women and expose you to risk. (from unnecessary procedures and even surgery)
It is not a recommended exam in the UK or Australia at any age. I'm 52 and have never had a routine bimanual exam.
Breast exams - there is no evidence they help, they don't bring down the death rate from cancer, but cause biopsies and some believe they are a risk factor for cancer.

Pap smears - you are pap-smeared to death....the excessive and inappropriate testing is reckless and harmful.
Testing virgins, teenagers, young women, elderly women, women who've had complete hysterectomies for benign conditions...and the over-screening of all women.
This is a rare cancer and testing carries risk, this test must be used sparingly and responsibly.

Finland has the lowest rates of cc in the world and sends the fewest women for biopsies after false positives - they test 5 to 7 times starting from 30 and then 5 yearly to 50, 55 or 60. Many American women in their 60's have had more than 40 pap smears - crazy! (testing under 25 is unsafe, unreliable and does not affect the tiny death rate from cancer)
Over-screening leads straight to day procedure and damage caused by these unnecessary treatments can leave you with problems - infertility, miscarriages, more c-sections, premature babies and psych issues etc.

Also you must free up birth control - doctors refuse to supply the Pill UNTIL women submit to optional testing and unnecessary exams - this amounts to coercion.
Doctors could not justify their conduct in a court of law.
Hysterectomies are more of the same, excess!
All for profit and in the practise of defensive "medicine".
See:Dr Joel Sherman's medical privacy blog under women's privacy issues.
Blogcritics and Unnecessary pap smears and the Violet to Blue site.
Good luck to all of you....

 
At December 10, 2010 at 9:18 AM , Blogger sherie said...

I had a full hysterectomy 1yr ago I am 50 years old. I was an active hiker; this was my way to cope with a stressful life. I have not been able to get back in the groove of hiking. I am taking .425 primarin, which stopped the night sweats. The symptoms I am having are wreaking havoc with my life; I need to get back on trail. Please give me some solutions, I am tired of crying.
conditions: Emotional dislocation: profound depression, crying, emotional blunting; loss of emotional connection and response to loved ones, Chronic debilitating fatigue which is not relieved by resting: loss of stamina and of ability to resume the pattern of life which preceded surgery, diminished ability to run a household, return to work, maintain family and social connections, painful joints, insomnia; panic attacks; heart palpitations; impaired memory and concentration; weight gain. I pulled these of f the article.
I have been seeking advice and am over whelmed with product and programs I cannot afford. I know I am going to need to modify something, please tell me what.

 
At December 10, 2010 at 9:53 AM , Blogger HERS Foundation said...

Sherie, The diminished or lost physical ability to engage in the same type of physical activity after hysterectomy is common. There are some things that may help you to get back to those activities, although it may not be at the same level as before the surgery.

It is difficult to maintain muscle mass after hysterectomy, so it is important to do daily exercise. One easy way to do that is by jumping rope. It's inexpensive ($4-$5 for a flexible jump rope with wooden handles at KMart).

The first thing in the morning after you empty your bladder is a good routine time to jump rope. Jump with your feet together. At first you may only jump two or three times, but every few days you will be able to do more. It is an excellent cardiovascular workout, and it will help you to maintain muscle mass.

There will be mornings when you fight with yourself and have to force yourself to jump rope, but it's important to do it six days a week to build up stamina.

Diet and DHEA are also important to mediating the common, often overwhelming fatigue hysterectomized women experience. If you would like to discuss these issues with a counselor contact Irene Park at HERS at 610.667.7757 and she will arrange a telephone appointment.

 
At March 21, 2011 at 7:54 PM , Anonymous hmatt said...

I had my hyst feb 3, 2010, after putting it off for 6 months, I had pre cancer cells in my uterus, and on my cervics, heavy bleeding 3 weeks a month, thats why I had surgrey. They left my ovaries,which they said would help me with hormones, I was 39 then, now I cant remember any thing, my joints hurt, I am tried all the time, no sex drive, I go from mad to crying in seconds back to happy in a mintue, as you can tell I cant spell worth a flip anymore either lol, really tho my family is really concerned for me, so what can I do now... help...

 
At March 29, 2011 at 10:22 PM , Anonymous rita chapman said...

how do I find my comments or questions I have posted recently? rkc2002

 
At March 29, 2011 at 10:29 PM , Blogger HERS Foundation said...

Rita, did you leave a comment on this blog post or was it one published more recently? You probably will have to do a find on the comments on each post to find your previous posts.

 
At January 21, 2012 at 1:26 AM , Anonymous Lynn Lynn said...

I am SO glad I didn't have a hysterectomy!
I was pre cancerous and said, HEY, lets roll,
I am now dying, but have my ovaries.!
Thumbs up Great work.!

 
At January 21, 2012 at 1:32 AM , Anonymous Lynn Sherwin said...

Ok, my first comment was SARCASTIC, and I am not dying of Cancer that I know of,
HOWEVER, I am due for a TAH, because of a PRE CANCEROUS polyp,
I am 55, enjoy full orgasm yadda yadda,
I am so upset, after reading the scare campaign here,
OF course, we , oh never mind,
DO you experts think a woman with PRE CANCEROUS TISSUE fore go a TAH, or let the CANCER GROW?

 
At January 21, 2012 at 9:48 AM , Anonymous BoyerBlog said...

Lynn, as I have read through the comments on this site, it appears that most women have had poor results to their hysterectomy, mostly due to having their ovaries removed. I would agree that having the ovaries removed would result in an abrupt loss of hormones and as a result many changes in mental/emotional/physical health.

However, I am one of the fortunate women who had a wonderful result of having my uterus removed. My doctor left my cervix and ovaries intact. I have never regretted having the uterus removed, never.

If you are due to have a hysterectomy due to precancerous issues, I can't imagine anyone aruging against that; however, if the ovaries do not have to be removed, don't! Even if you have gone through menopause, the ovaries still provide hormones....keep them if you can. Your sex life can remain as wonderful as always....

 
At January 21, 2012 at 5:42 PM , Blogger HERS Foundation said...

Whether you decide that hysterectomy, or a conservative alternative to hysterectomy, is the best choice for you an informed decision requires information. In many instances, particularly in one like Lynn's situation, it is often possible to entirely remove polyps. It is important for polyps to be removed at the base, a surgery called polypectomy.

Regardless of the reason hysterectomy is recommended, all women should be informed of the consequences of hysterectomy. HERS has an informative video "Female Anatomy: the Functions of the Female Organs" at www.hersfoundation.org/anatomy. It describes what and where the female organs are, the functions of the organs, and how the pelvis changes when the uterus and/or ovaries are removed.

 
At January 2, 2013 at 1:46 PM , Anonymous Miranda said...

Since my complete hysterectomy for uterine cancer years ago, it is extremely painful to attempt intercourse - I say 'attempt' because even with lubrication, my husband is barely able to get more than an inch inside ... very sad and I wish there was something I could do ...

 
At February 23, 2013 at 5:39 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Please can fibroid cause open cervix?

 
At February 24, 2013 at 1:45 PM , Anonymous Jenny said...

I am 27 years with fibroid, which causes severe pain, heavy bleeding and clothing during my menstruation. i also have open cervix,could this be as a result of the fibroid?

 
At February 24, 2013 at 9:08 PM , Blogger HERS Foundation said...

Jenny,

Your open cervix is not likely to be related to your fibroids unless you have a fibroid that is hanging down low and into the cervix. This would be determined during an ultrasound.

If you have large blood clots and heavy menstrual bleeding (going through 2 super pads in 20-30 minutes), it is probably from a submucosal fibroid, one that is located in inside, endometrial layer of the uterus.

You never need a hysterectomy for fibroids unless you have the wrong doctor.

You can learn more detailed information about fibroids on HERS website at www.hersfoundation.org. Scroll down to the "Fibroids" link. Then scroll down to the "Myomectomy" link.

You can also receive more information by email by going to HERS homepage www.hersfoundation.org and filling out the contact form.

 
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